Anthony Joshua vs Oleksandr Usyk review: A fork in the road or a new era of dominance in Heavyweight Boxing?

At the time of writing it’s been nearly a week since Oleksandr Usyk shocked the boxing world and stripped Anthony Joshua of his WBA Super, WBO, and IBF world heavyweight titles. The dust has settled and people have drawn their conclusions of what this fight proved and what the future could hold for both men. Nobody really needs another opinion to be thrown into the void of the internet but without it this blog wouldn’t exist so here I am! This was an incredible fight, make no mistake about it. I know that you should never underestimate anyone in the heavyweight division, especially Usyk, but I didn’t see this happening. It wasn’t only a win for Usyk, it was a complete demolition job. This was the biggest fight of his career so far and without shadow of a doubt his biggest win. It adds to his already impressive CV of wins away from his native Ukraine, where he has already beaten Tony Bellew and Derek Chisora in England, Michael Hunter in the United States, Marco Huck in Germany, and won in hostile environments in Poland, Latvia, and Russia against Krzysztof Glowacki, Mairis Briedis, and Murat Gassiev respectively.

He lured AJ into his trap from the first bell and didn’t let him go. His jab was relentless and he didn’t take his foot off the gas for the full 12 rounds. It seemed like everyone was waiting for Usyk to tire a bit so it could lead to Joshua piling on the pressure but it didn’t happen. Usyk has one hell of an engine and an even stronger chin. Whenever he did find himself in spots of bother he clinched on and fought on the inside. Many thought before the fight that Joshua would be able to use his size to his advantage against someone who was 9 kilograms lighter and 3 inches shorter, but if anything Usyk did. He was much lighter on his feet and looked far quicker. Joshua did well in the sixth and seventh rounds when he won more success with shots to the body but he couldn’t keep it up and looked tired as the rounds went on, with Usyk pouring on the pressure and wobbling Joshua a few times. This isn’t the first time Joshua has lost his titles but this felt incredibly different to the first fight against Andy Ruiz Jr. Ruiz caught him on the temple which in turn ruined his equilibrium and balance for the rest of the fight before the stoppage, Usyk completely dominated the bout.

According to the point-scoring system CompuBox, a computerised point scoring system used for fights around the world, Usyk not only landed the more punches (148 landed compared to Joshua’s 123) he also landed a greater percentage of his punches (28% to Joshua’s 19.2%). Whilst AJ was technically the busier fighter throwing 641 punches compared to Usyk’s 529, Usyk made his count much more. Interestingly, Usyk’s 148 landing punches is the highest amount landed by any of AJ’s previous opponents and in round 12 Usyk landed 29 shots which is the most any opponent has landed on Joshua in a single round. Through Usyk’s incredibly impressive win it means he’s only the third person to hold world titles at cruiserweight and heavyweight, after Evander Holyfield and David Haye (not the worst company for the Ukrainian).

So what exactly does this all mean? In my opinion, it shows that Oleksandr Usyk really is that good and I honestly believe he will be a huge draw in the UK for years to come. Not only is he a great boxer he has a brilliant personality to go with it. Some people online are trying to use the result to shine Joshua in a negative light and I couldn’t disagree with them more. All you need to do is look at Usyk’s career path. You don’t become an amateur world champion, win a gold medal at the Olympics, unify the world titles at cruiserweight, make the jump to heavyweight, end up dethroning one of the division’s biggest names in your third fight at the weight, and do all of this while undefeated by accident. None of that is a fluke, in the same way that Joshua didn’t win Olympic gold and his heavyweight titles by being a naff boxer which people are still trying to argue in the big ol year of 2021. It’s proven that AJ can fight conservative and box well in his wins over the likes of Andy Ruiz, Joseph Parker, and to an extent Kubrat Pulev before the knockout as well as possessing terrifying power which stopped the likes of Dillian Whyte, Wladimir Klitschko, and Alexander Povetkin.

Fans will understandably be disappointed as it means an all British fight between AJ and the ‘Gypsy King’ Tyson Fury is off the cards for the foreseeable future with a rematch with Usyk in Kiev looking incredibly likely for Joshua. I really wanted that fight as did everyone else in the boxing world and we were so close to seeing it but Fury got tied up into a trilogy fight with Deontay Wilder. This isn’t to say that the fight won’t happen one day, Joshua may end up winning the rematch setting up a Fury showdown next summer. Fury-Joshua for all the belts at Wembley, July 2022 anyone? Even if not try and tell me after Saturday’s fight that you wouldn’t want to see a Fury-Usyk unification if it came to it. If Usyk wins the heavily rumoured rematch with AJ then that’s easily the two best heavyweights in the world fighting for full heavyweight unification (for what it’s worth I think Usyk would beat Wilder fairly comfortably, not a hater I just think he doesn’t have as strong a ring IQ as AJ and Usyk coped with him fine). This is all just hearsay mind and who knows what will end up happening next, plus we all now how quickly things could change in the division in the next few months (I’m looking at you potential Joe Joyce WBO mandatory).

Saturday night will be one of those performances that will be talked about for years to come. How the challenger came into the champion’s back garden with 67,000 in attendance watching on, rose hell, and left with the titles. You can’t underplay Usyk’s performance at all. Maybe Joshua wasn’t at his best on the night but in all honesty I’m not sure which plan would’ve stopped Usyk from getting the win. This could definitely be the start of something special in the heavyweight division. There’s a new king at the table and he won’t be going away anytime soon.

YouTube star Logan Paul vs all-time great Floyd Mayweather: Yep, you read that right

I was hoping that I’d be done talking about this kind of thing. I made the post many moons ago before the pandemic and masks were a thing and the words “social distancing” didn’t exist (god those were the days) about the big YouTube fellas, KSI and Logan Paul, fighting each other at the Staples Centre in Los Angeles and assumed that it would be the end of it all. They’d get their bit of time in the spotlight on Sky Sports Box Office, along with a handsome pay day and YouTube boxing would ride off peacefully into the sunset with somewhat of a reputation in tact. In reality, couldn’t be further from the truth. What came next was Logan’s younger and somehow more obnoxious brother, Jake, deciding he wanted a go.* Jake then took on some of the most prestigious names in the sport in the form of fellow YouTuber AnesonGib, ex-NBA basketball star Nate Robinson, and retired MMA fighter Ben Askren. Huge names on the record which should surely set up a mega-fight with somebody like a bouncer from any Wetherspoons in South Wales, or Coronation Street’s Roy Cropper, but instead opting for another retired MMA fighter in the form of Tyron Woodley. All the while, Logan went a bit quiet after his sole loss before setting up an exhibition match with (and I wish I was joking) undefeated former five weight world champion Floyd ‘Money’ Mayweather. Eight three-minute rounds with no official winner, there will be no judges scoring, it won’t go to a decision, knockouts and stoppages are allowed and the referee can stop the fight at any time. It’s essentially a sparring session without headguards, fun.

*Kinda harsh from me here, Logan actually isn’t that bad a bloke. He’s been on a bit of a road to redemption in the last few years and comes across like a nice guy. He used his social media platforms well during the Black Lives Matter protests in the summer of 2020 and has challenged toxic masculinity on his podcast before. Seems like the type of guy you’d like to have a beer with.

The fight was originally supposed to happen in early 2021 but has since been rearranged for the 6th of June at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami. The fight will be shown live on Sky Sports Box Office with an undercard that’s interesting to say the least. Sweden’s Badou Jack was supposed to rematch Jean Pascal for the WBA light-heavyweight title however that fight is off due to Pascal failing a drug test. Instead, Jack faces undefeated Venezuelan star Dervin Colina instead. The card also sees former unified light-middleweight champion Jarret Hurd take on Luis Arias, and former Cincinnati Bengals wide receiver and NFL legend Chad Johnson making his debut in an exhibition bout. There’s some big names and tasty fights on the undercard but it shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise, the KSI-Logan undercard featured the likes of Devin Haney and Billy Joe Saunders.

People can laugh and joke (and have, quite a lot) but this seriously needs to be talked about. Despite what I’ve written I’m not necessarily against the YouTube boxing scene. Sure it’s a bit gimmicky and sometimes a bit cringey but it’s a bit of fun for some internet peeps who have wanted to do this kind of thing and it brings more eyes to the sport. When it goes this far is when serious red flags are raised and alarm bells start to ring for me. This isn’t somebody with a few years training fighting another internet star, athlete from another sport or even a journeyman (which I still wouldn’t be 100% comfortable with), this is going against a pound for pound king and one of the greatest fighters of this generation.  Even though Floyd didn’t have a reputation as the biggest knockout artist by the end of his career, this could end in a really nasty way. Look at the McGregor fight and how beat up Conor got, or even the exhibition Floyd had with Japanese kickboxer Tenshin Nasukawa. Both were unbelievably one sided even though they had backgrounds in combat sport.

I’m not a fan of this at all, and I’m pretty worried Logan could end up badly hurt. As grim as it sounds, and I’m praying he doesn’t, it’s a very real possibility. If the whole YouTube fighting thing carries on, put them against each other or other celebrities. It’s all well and good seeing Logan fight Mayweather or Jake Paul call out Tommy Fury and Conor McGregor but it’s only a matter of time before somebody gets seriously injured and all of a sudden boxing is the bad guy again for letting it happen. Jake saying how he’s an elite level fighter after fighting three nobodies in the world of boxing is not only wrong but again, downright dangerous. It’s led to him to be called out by the IBF and Ring Cruiserweight champion Mairis Briedis, which I doubt he would turn down because he believes his own hype so much (good luck finding a governing body on the planet that would be happy to sanction that fight) and he’d end up badly hurt, same way he would if he ended up fighting McGregor or Tommy Fury. The furthest I’d be begrudgingly happy to see it go would be a fight with somebody like Sonny Bill Williams or Paul Gallen, former sportsmen who have some background in boxing. But even still I’d probably have to watch from behind the sofa for a Sonny Bill Williams – Jake Paul fight.

My main hope for all this is that it’s the beginning of the end. YouTube stars boxing can do what they want so long as it doesn’t get stupider than this. Calling out ex and current professionals is not a path I want to see this go down and in the long run it’s just going to end in tears. Hopefully the Logan Paul-Floyd Mayweather fight is decent enough for the fans in attendance sake (and the nutcases over the world who stay up for it), ends fairly quickly and nobody gets seriously hurt. Then for the love of god and all that’s holy can this nonsense about fighting actual boxers or MMA fighters who can actually punch PLEASE stop before one of them (I’m looking at you Jake Paul) takes an unwinnable fight against a professional at the top of their game because that will not be pretty. Do I like the idea of Jake Paul fighting nobodies and parading himself around like he’s the best thing since sliced bread? No, it’s annoying. But I like the idea of him fighting somebody like Conor McGregor, Tommy Fury, Mairis Briedis, or Kamaru Usman a hell of a lot less.

My personal prediction for the fight is Floyd starts off jabbing and testing the water like he did against McGregor, Logan goes in swinging like a mad man in the hope of landing something before Floyd sees red and throws a mental combo which comes out of nowhere and the fight gets stopped. All within the first two minutes as well, I really don’t see this going more than one round. But hey, what do I know.

KSI vs Logan Paul 2: The Internet Stars Going Pro

So this is bound to divide opinion. It was announced on Tuesday the 3rd of September that the boxing rematch between YouTube stars KSI (real name Olajide Olatunji) and Logan Paul will take place on the 9th of November in the Staples Centre, Los Angeles, following their first bout which took place in Manchester last August ending in a majority draw. What has arguably grabbed headlines the most however is the fact that both men are turning professional and the fight is being promoted by Matchroom Boxing and is to be broadcast live on streaming service DAZN. This time there will be no headguards and is taking place as a professional boxing match with strong rumours of big name professional stars fighting on the undercard. To say the response to this ambitious move has been varied would be an understatement with some fans calling the event an absolute shambles and others saying how it will actually do more good for the sport of boxing than people might think. Both arguments are fair and people rightfully feel excited or frustrated about the event, therefore I’m going to take a look at what are the positives and negatives of the internet’s biggest rivalry turning professional.

First of all, a look at the positive sides of the argument. When the pair met in late August 2018 the fight was broadcast on a YouTube pay per view system with a set price of $10 (or around £8). On fight night over 1 million people bought the fight and around 1.2 million people watched the event on illegal streams on streaming website Twitch making it the most watched non-professional boxing match of all time. To put the PPV buys into perspective, Tyson Fury vs Deontay Wilder made around 400,000 buys, Anthony Joshua vs Andy Ruiz Jr was somewhere between the 400,000–500,000 buy mark and the second fight between Carl Froch and George Groves generated around 350,000 purchases . From a business point of view, it makes perfect sense to make the fight a professional bout as it’s bound to bring in a large viewing audience. The interest is obviously there and I imagine it will do huge viewing figures on fight night. Also, look at it for what it actually is. It’s two fighters making their professional boxing debuts. They’re both licensed pro fighters and this will be their first professional bout and what an audience to make your debut. The last bout had a bit of a professional feel to it in the build up with a “Gloves Are Off” special interview hosted by Johnny Nelson, two “press conferences” in Los Angeles and London (they weren’t much of press conferences though, more shouting matches) and a weigh-in the day before fight night. The only thing missing was the fact it wasn’t a professional bout however this time it is. Most importantly, this could bring a whole new audience to the sport of boxing. With the rumours of a strong undercard featuring the exciting Devin Haney and Billy Joe Saunders defending his WBO Super–Middleweight title (nothing should surprise me in boxing anymore but, what?!?!?!) this could see a new wave of fans drawn to the sport and even inspire some to take up boxing. Hopefully, this event will bring many new eyes to the sport.

However, there are many good reasons to argue why this shouldn’t be a professional bout. The main argument is purely, why? Yes it’s going to make a lot of money but business aside, why do it? I’m 1 million percent sure that no other YouTubers will be fighting on the card or commentating on the live broadcast which was part of the draw for their target audience last time. By putting KSI and Logan as the headliner but having huge names like Billy Joe Saunders and Devin Haney on the undercard (I still can’t get my head around Billy Joe possibly on an undercard for any fight, let alone this one) there is no way any celebrities or YouTube stars are getting anywhere near the card. Furthermore, it could make for a bit of a strange atmosphere come fight night. You’ll get people in attendance there only for KSI and Logan whilst not caring in the slightest about the undercard and others who will be there for Billy Joe or Haney and couldn’t care less about the main event. Both of which is damaging to the professionals on the undercard and the main event. The system they used for their previous bout (and the KSI–Joe Weller fight before that) by having other YouTubers on the card in non-professional fights and YouTube stars True Geordie and Laurence McKenna on commentary worked perfectly fine for their target audience. This time however I think it’s a bit ambitious to make it a professional bout if other YouTube stars involved in previous events was part of the attraction and that’s being taken away. If the rumours are true (and it looks like they are) that Billy Joe Saunders and Devin Haney are on the undercard then, in my opinion, that’s just a strange move. Saunders is a world champion and could easily headline a PPV on his own and Haney is probably 1 or 2 fights away from Vasyl Lomachenko, are these really the fighters you need on the undercard? I get that having them on the undercard would make the event seem even bigger than it already is, however if over 1 million people bought it last time is there need to make these fights on the undercard when there’s already a huge following for the bout? If professional fights are being put on the undercard, then why not use this opportunity to promote some young fighters to a big audience? The fight has not been received too well by some hardcore boxing fans with it being described as disrespectful, a farce and a mockery of the sport. The main frustration is that there are countless pros who have worked tirelessly for years and would give an arm and a leg to get where KSI and Logan are in terms of headlining at an arena like the Staples Centre yet they’re doing it in their professional debuts. Whilst a valid point, they’ve established a huge following and regardless of where the fight was held it was always going to sell out. Some fear that this could be the catalyst for a trend of celebrities and reality stars turning professional without too much background in the sport just for the money. Again, whilst a valid point, professional governing bodies would need to approve for them to turn professional and personally I don’t see it happening if too many applied to turn pro after little/no previous fights.

It was always going to bring controversy. Who knows what’ll happen come fight night, there’s no doubt it will be a success business wise but the response and aftermath will be mixed to say the least. However one thing is for certain, it will completely rock the landscape of boxing and will change the sport on a huge scale for better or worse.

Ruiz v Joshua 2: Saudi Arabia showdown. Yay or nay?

After what’s felt like forever since the first fight and nearly 10 weeks of negotiations, the highly anticipated rematch of Andy Ruiz Jr vs Anthony Joshua for the WBA Super, WBO and IBF world heavyweight titles has been finally announced for December 7th. Since the upset at Madison Square Garden which rocked the boxing world with Ruiz dethroning Joshua as unified champion, fans and fighters alike have been talking about the rematch. What they wouldn’t have predicted, however, is that it would be held in Diriyah, a town just North West of Saudi Arabia’s capital Riyadh. First of all, what? It’s come as a surprise to many with weeks of confusion surrounding where the rematch would be held, Cardiff seemed to be the front runner for a while or a trip back to the States but not many would’ve predicted Saudi Arabia. I would’ve guessed Antarctica before Saudi Arabia but maybe it shouldn’t be too much of a surprise with Amir Khan recently fighting in Jeddah and the World Boxing Super Series Super Middleweight tournament final being held there also. I try to keep my posts as unbiased as possible, even if this one might be a bit trickier, and I’ll take a look at some of the pros and cons as to whether a fight this big should be held in Saudi Arabia.

First up the pros, and whilst it may seem tricky to see some there are definitely a few. Saudi Arabia is a completely new market for boxing and could become a popular place for the sport in years to come. As previously mentioned, Callum Smith beat George Groves in Jeddah to win the Super Middleweight edition of the World Boxing Super Series in September 2018 and Amir Khan recently beat Billy Dib also in Jeddah for the WBC International Welterweight title (even if it was a bit of a strange show, I honestly didn’t know Samuel Peter was still fighting until he took on Hughie Fury on the undercard). Other sporting events have also been held in Saudi Arabia in recent years such as Formula-E (with Diriyah set to be the opening race of the 2019/20 season in November this year), WWE’s Greatest Royal Rumble, Crown Jewel and Super Showdown shows and the Saudi International golf tournament. It’s no surprise that Saudi Arabia have the capability to hold big sporting events that locals and tourists will enjoy. All this is part of the Saudi Vision 2030 project where Saudi Arabia are trying to become less dependent on their oil as a mean to grow their economy and the entertainment sector has had over $2 billion invested in order to hold such events. For the points mentioned, the bout that’s being dubbed “Clash on the Dunes” could be fantastic for Saudi Arabia in terms of the future of boxing and sport (even though they’ve missed a golden opportunity by not calling it “Rowdy in Saudi” like I suggested on twitter, come on Matchroom you know it makes sense) and there’s no doubts it’ll be just as exciting as the first bout.

However there are obvious cons and some grey areas about holding a fight this big in Saudi Arabia, one of the biggest is that it’s a huge risk. Yes big fights have been held in Saudi Arabia before and there’s a potentially huge market there but is it worth the risk? A Ruiz–Joshua rematch could easily sell out any stadium or arena in the UK or the USA however with the rumours both parties wanted it on neutral ground it definitely would’ve sold out stadiums in a neutral European venue such as Italy, Germany or France, so why risk it in a place where the sports and entertainment industry is still developing? It could also make it more of a difficult sell for British fans to travel to support Joshua considering Saudi Arabia used to be an incredibly difficult country to travel to. British fans have a history of supporting British fighters abroad creating a fantastic atmosphere following the likes of Ricky Hatton, Tyson Fury and Anthony Joshua himself for the first Ruiz fight. It’s much easier now to get into Saudi Arabia with tourist visas available for the first time however they come at a price. Fans would probably have to get a “Sharek” visa (visa specific for sports and entertainment events) which costs around $170 which is pretty expensive compared to the $14 it costs for Brits to get an esta to enter the US. The closest major city to Diriyah is the capital, Riyadh, which is anything but a cheap date when it comes to nice hotels, restaurants and shops. Add in the ticket price (although apparently a visa will be included with it) and flights it’ll get expensive quite quickly. Considering Christmas will only be 18 days away from fight night it’s highly possible that fans won’t want to spend big so soon to the holidays and give the trip a miss. Also just this morning, Andy Ruiz Jr said on Instagram that apparently the fight isn’t taking place in Saudi Arabia but on his terms in the United States. Great. So we will probably have the Heavyweight Champion of the World fighting in a neutral location begrudgingly in his first defence of his titles, what fun. America would be a safe bet as Ruiz never really wanted to fight in the UK and it would be a brilliant second chance for AJ to re-introduce himself to the US market, however Saudi Arabia is where it’s happening.

Overall, this will change the boxing landscape forever. It’ll either establish Saudi Arabia as a serious competitor in the boxing world and could see many future huge fights over there or it’ll be a case of too much too soon. Politics and debates aside, this will be an incredible fight with everything on the line. The last one was exciting and full of drama and this one will be no different. Joshua and Ruiz will make huge statements by getting a win, however the winner won’t be able to get too carried away as a bout with WBO mandatory Oleksandr Usyk will be looming in the not too distant future.

Heavy Duty: One of the non-PPV Shows of the Year

In less than two weeks’ time heavyweight boxing is coming to the O2 arena with arguably the two most promising young British heavyweights, Daniel Dubois and Nathan Gorman, squaring off for the British Heavyweight Championship. The card dubbed “Heavy Duty” is packed with talent from top to bottom featuring young promising fighters and some more experienced all headed by Daniel Dubois against Nathan Gorman having it out in the squared circle. It’s exciting to see two undefeated stars on a non-PPV card, especially in an age where fights between big undefeated stars are somewhat of a rarity. In this post I’ll be running through the big fights on the card and how this is one of the best non-PPV cards of the year.

A good place to start is the main event which when it was announced got me very excited. After the British Boxing Board of Control ordered Dubois–Gorman last November my instant thought was whilst this was big news ultimately not to get too excited as it may come to nothing, something us boxing fans are unfortunately all too familiar with. Countless times have fights been ordered, I get excited and it eventually comes to nothing. Will I ever learn? Of course not, I’ll continue to get my hopes up for things I want only for it all to come crashing down, oh the joys of being a sports fan. However I’m glad that I’m wrong in the instance of Dubois–Gorman as it’s a fantastic fight. Nathan Gorman is a fast, skilful and intelligent fighter with a great ring iq. As well as this he’s a heavy hitter and fights out of the orthodox stance, a perfect all-rounder. Daniel Dubois also fights with an orthodox stance but is strong, heavy hitter with devastating knockout power. Although, in my opinion, Dubois has an underrated boxing skill that makes him dangerous for any fighter. Both have been the distance before but I doubt that either will want this one to go  12 rounds, a knockout win for either man would be a massive statement in their early careers. The winner will be seen in a whole new light with this being the biggest win of their careers so far, however it will be far from the end for the loser. Dubois is only 21 and Gorman is 23 meaning they have plenty of time to re-build coming off an early loss (also meaning both are only a few years older than I am and are headlining the O2 while I’m sat at home eating rice crispies while writing this, way to put things in a harsh perspective). I doubt this will be the last time both men fight with them being so young and talented. They’ll only get better with experience and age and will become bigger names in the heavyweight division as they improve, this would definitely be another huge fight in a few years’ time which no doubt in my mind people will want to see.

The co-feature bout sees another big heavyweight contest with undefeated silver medal Olympian Joe Joyce squaring off against former world title contender Bryant Jennings with his only losses coming against Wladimir Klitschko, Luis Ortiz and in his last outing against Oscar Rivas. Without shadow of a doubt this is the biggest test of Joyce’s career so far. Joyce already has impressive stoppage wins over Alexander Ustinov (former competitor for the WBA Regular Title against Manuel Charr) and former WBC Heavyweight Champion Bermane Stiverne (the first man to take current WBC champ Deontay Wilder 12 rounds). This fight is a great test for Joyce to see how far he can make it in the heavyweight division. Some say at 33 years old time isn’t necessarily on Joyce’s side (personally disagree but that’s another argument) however he has been making serious moves in the division in his young professional career. After the Bryant fight, Joyce would have fought two former world title challengers and a former world champion in only 10 fights. A win against Jennings would push Joyce to another level and with rumours in the past of a bout with Luis Ortiz, maybe a win against Jennings would be enough to get the Ortiz fight next. This is a great fight and an incredible co-feature bout for the card. Having a fight this size on the undercard makes the main event feel even bigger and a win for either man would be massive for them. As stated Jennings is a former world title contender but will Joyce’s ruthless style be too much for the American? Obviously I don’t have the answers as I can’t see into the future but nonetheless it will make for an interesting and entertaining fight.

The rest of the card is stacked with talent and great bouts, most notably are local hero Liam Williams, Sunny Edwards and Archie Sharp. British middleweight champion Liam Williams takes on French middleweight Karim Achour for the vacant WBC Silver Middleweight Championship. Williams comes into the fight off the back of two impressive knockout wins in his last two outings against Mark Heffron and Joe Mullender. A world title shot doesn’t seem too unlikely for Williams in the not so distant future and a win against Achour would definitely shoot him in the right direction for a huge world title bout. Elsewhere, Sunny Edwards looks to extend his 11-0 unbeaten record taking on Hiram Gallardo for the vacant IBF International Super Flyweight Title to add to his WBO European and International Super Flyweight championships. Sunny is one half of “the Croydon Klitschko’s” with his brother (and WBC Flyweight Champion) Charlie Edwards and in my opinion will follow him in one day becoming world champion. Sunny has bags of talent and potential definitely having what it takes to become Super Flyweight Champion of the world when his time comes. Also on the card Archie Sharp looks to defend his WBO European Super Featherweight Championship against Jordan McCorry. Sharp won the title against Lyon Woodstock last October in a war over 10 rounds. This should be an entertaining fight (like the rest on the card that I’ve mentioned) and should Sharp get through there are exciting domestic fights to be made against the likes of Sam Bowen and Zelfa Barrett.

Overall, the 13th of July will be an entertaining night of boxing and one of the non-PPV shows of the year. Having two big domestic names like Gorman and Dubois fighting each other at the O2 for the British Championship not only makes them bigger names but makes the British Championship feel more important which is good to see. A great main event on an already fantastic night of boxing makes Heavy Duty one to certainly look forward to.